Splitting Up Some Maple

Discussion about the various types of wood and charcoal used in outdoor cooking
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Smokin Mike
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Splitting Up Some Maple

Post by Smokin Mike »

According to a woodworker friend of mine this is Birdseye Maple.

Birdseye.png


Until I researched it, I had no clue that Birdseye Maple is supposed to be the rarest of the rare woods. I guess that explains why my buddy about tripped over himself loading up his van with as much of this stuff that he could. LOL

It came from a tree that looks like this. I'm not sure of the exact variety... it could be a sugar maple or maybe a silver maple.

MapleTree.png



Anyway, I split up what was left over. One pile is short splits, which after it gets seasoned, I plan to cook with. The other pile is longer splits that I could either cut short or use in the fire pit.

MapleWoodPile.png
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Re: Splitting Up Some Maple

Post by 1MoreFord »

Birdseye Maple's rarity is from its use in woodworking. It won't flavor any differently than the next piece from the same tree that isn't birdseye figured.

Maple is too good to go in a burn pit if you have other, more ordinary, wood for the pit.
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Re: Splitting Up Some Maple

Post by Smokin Mike »

1MoreFord wrote: Mon Dec 07, 2020 8:18 pm Maple is too good to go in a burn pit if you have other, more ordinary, wood for the pit.
Joe, I got more wood than I know what to do with. I suppose you could call that a blessing. This maple was from a tree cutting job that I did up the street. Actually there were two maples involved. The homeowner got a good bit of it for her fire pit, two woodworkers got all they could haul, and I was left with two 5 foot trunks and other cross grain crap. The only other wood that would be a candidate for the fire pit is a rack of white oak. I already have full racks of maple, hickory, black cherry, and red oak. Probably more cook wood than I'll use in the next 10 years.
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Re: Splitting Up Some Maple

Post by 1MoreFord »

Mike,

Down here in the South maple is one of the more rare woods.

There is no sugar maple. Most/all of what we can find is soft maple.

Similarly Alder is unobtainium thru local growth. No mesquite in my state either.
Joe
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