Total noob to curing

Bacon, Sausage, Ham, Pastrami, Prosciutto, Chorizo, etc.
Discuss your method of preparing them.
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gandrfab
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Total noob to curing

Post by gandrfab »

This video caught my eye and looks like where I would like to start my adventure in home made slicing ham.

The vid is about 12:min.
This particular process will be fine in our home because it can be done within the use by freeze by date.
I'll need some solid instruction for keeping and using meats past there use/freeze by dates that has been so ingrained in a family members safe eating protocol, to have hope in going any further.
I'm not fully comfortable with the smoke shown in this video for temp. and time.

Thanks, Matt


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Re: Total noob to curing

Post by Smokin Mike »

My one and only foray into curing a green ham was mediocre at best. It wasn't bad but it didn't rock my world either. It just didn't taste "hammy". I should have injected the ham instead of just floating it in a cure bath. I ate it anyway. I'll try curing again if I can catch a ham on sale.

About that video :shock: that guy seemed to be pretty haphazard in his process. I remember at TSR, Harry Nutczak went to great lengths cautioning folks to be very careful with the ratio of curing salts to liquid else you risk poisoning. A gallon of water weighs 8.35 pounds so it's not that hard to determine ratio based on weight. And couldn't that guy find a spoon to stir his mix???

Anyway, wet curing a ham doesn't really prolong its shelf life. It'll still spoil after a period of time. I usually vacuum seal and freeze the leftovers. Now if you want to go old school then there's salt and sugar dry curing and you can hang the ham in a cold room to "age". The salt curing makes country ham and the sugar cure makes a Virginia style ham. There's plenty of info out there on the interwebs that shows how to dry age a ham if that's what you're looking for.

So let us know how it turns out, whichever method you choose.
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Re: Total noob to curing

Post by Glenn »

I invited our Corporate Pastor to join us here. He just started a pastrami cure this past weekend, so I'm hoping he comes here to discuss and document.
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gandrfab
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Re: Total noob to curing

Post by gandrfab »

Not knowing where to look and surfing the www for answers I stumbled on this page.
As of now I have no intentions of dry curing.

https://www.smokedbbqsource.com/curing-salts-guide/

Wet curing or Brining
This is the process of fully submerging the meat into a chilled solution of salt cure and flavors.

You will need to use containers or bags that are not going to react with the salt cure solution. Also remember that if you are going to be leaving your meat in the solution for more than 7 days, the solution should be replaced. You will also need to stir the solution occasionally to ensure that the salts in the solution are dispersed evenly.

If you are having trouble keeping the meat fully submerged, you can weigh it down with a dinner plate or something similar.

Advantages: This process takes a lot less time than dry curing. It also achieves a more even spread of curing solution throughout your meat than injecting.

Humidity is easier to control while wet curing, and the lack of oxygen in the process means nasty bacteria don’t get the chance to grow.

Disadvantages: This method is generally only practical for smaller cuts of meat. Otherwise sourcing a tub big enough might prove a challenge!

Injecting
In this method the curing salt is made into a solution. The meat is then injected with the curing solution. In a commercial setting, this is achieved using many fine needles. Often, cheaper hams, bacon and corned beef are cured using this method.

Advantages: This method can speed up the curing process.

Disadvantages: For someone using this method at home without commercial scale equipment, an even spread of curing solution may be hard to achieve. The result is pockets of meat with either lots of curing solution, or none at all.

Another issue is that this method can leave your meat a little flavorless, plumped up and watery.

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Re: Total noob to curing

Post by k.a.m. »

I am getting into jerky making now. I use our Traeger pellet cooker it works great for making jerky.
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Re: Total noob to curing

Post by zelix »

This is something I'm a noobie to as well. I hope to learn how to make cured meat. My brother in law is a wizard at it. He makes these PA soupies (soppressata ) that are incredible. I'll try to get the recipe and instructions to post here. I'll also post a few pictures of them. I'm waiting for him to send some soon.

I have made a lot of smoked deer sausages of different varieties. So I'm not completely ignorant to cured meat. :lol:


The soupies is on the left here in this picture.
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gandrfab
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Re: Total noob to curing

Post by gandrfab »

I'm having a hell of a time finding consistent numbers for using cure #1 to pounds of meat ratios.
Some are .o2 grams specific and others at couple spoons full :shock:
Any help or recommendations, please.
This one could be a 2lb ham or a 5 lb ham same nitrate. wth
https://delishably.com/meat-dishes/How- ... am-at-Home

I'm leaning towards my 1st experiment using a pork loin wet cure.

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gandrfab
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Re: Total noob to curing

Post by gandrfab »

I'm getting a little excited , curing salt showed up yesterday.

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/101 ... erloin-ham

YIELD4 pounds cured pork tenderloin, about 24 servings
TIME1 hour 30 minutes, plus 5 days’ storing

1 cup kosher salt
1 cup sugar
12 cups boiling water
1 teaspoon black peppercorns
1 teaspoon mustard seeds
½ teaspoon allspice berries
½ teaspoon cloves
½ teaspoon dried thyme
2 bay leaves
1 teaspoon curing salt (sel rose)
1 cup dry white wine for brine, plus 1/2 cup for cooking
4 pork tenderloins, about 1 pound each
2 medium onions, thinly sliced
1 small bunch fresh thyme

PREPARATION
1. Put salt and sugar in a large nonreactive bowl (stainless steel or glass). Add boiling water and stir well to dissolve salt and sugar. Add peppercorns, mustard seeds, allspice berries, cloves, thyme and bay leaves. Leave to cool completely.

2.Add curing salt and 1 cup white wine to cooled brine. Submerge pork tenderloins in brine. Place plate directly on top of pork to keep it submerged if necessary. Cover container and refrigerate for 5 days.

3.Remove pork from brine and pat dry. Discard brine. Spread onions and thyme sprigs on bottom of a large shallow baking dish. Add brined tenderloins in one layer, then add 1/2 cup wine. Heat oven to 350 degrees; as it heats, bring meat to room temperature. Cover dish and bake for 45 minutes or until pork registers 135 degrees with an instant-read thermometer. Remove from oven (meat will continue to cook and reach 140 degrees as it rests). Let cool before cutting into thin slices. Serve with buttermilk biscuits. May be refrigerated, well wrapped, for up to 1 week.

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gandrfab
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Re: Total noob to curing

Post by gandrfab »

Getting closer, ........

https://genuineideas.com/ArticlesIndex/ ... evels.html
So toxicologists and epidemiologists "triangulate" on a safe dose. They start with the lethal dose as the upper limit. Since not everyone reacts to the same toxin in the same way, the accepted "Lethal Dose" threshold is LD50 where half the people die. Or, in the absence of accidental human poisoning, where half the lab rats perish.
Scientists then run studies searching for the LOAEL, or Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Level. These are non-fatal drug responses, like shortness of breath, or hives, or a diminished reaction time. While tolerable, these minor effects may telegraph the early stages of a more dangerous reaction, so are treated with respect.

In the case of nitrItes, the LOAEL is around 1/40th the dose of LD50, or 5 mg/kg.

And now comes the hard part: do you set the regulatory standard above or below the LOAEL, and by how much? You want to keep people safe, but also hope to minimize regulatory burdens on businesses. And leave people free to make their own mistakes.


nitrite WET curing calculator
https://genuineideas.com/ArticlesIndex/ ... lator.html

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